If you keep up with celebrity news you’ve seen the articles claiming a toxic work environment behind the scenes of the Ellen Degeneres Show. 

Employees are coming forward and sharing their negative experiences working on the show, and there are some pretty serious allegations against Ellen, her producers, and the environment as a whole.

To be clear, I’m not saying the claims against Ellen and her team are true or false or taking a stance on the issue. However, there are some teachable moments in this whole debacle, especially around leadership accountability. 

First, top leaders have an increased responsibility for perpetuating positive behavior, and for addressing negative behavior when it occurs. While everyone is responsible for culture, leaders especially, set the tone for what is and isn’t okay. It comes from the top down. 

For example, Ellen’s producer, Ed Galvin, was specifically identified as a consistent aggressor. Reports claim that he yells at staff, uses intimidating tactics in meetings, and even has a history of sexual harassment.

Apparently, he behaved this way in production meetings with Ellen present and she did not address the behavior. Her silence communicated that negative behavior would be tolerated and is even condoned. Not to mention, it sent the message that reporting similar or worse behaviors was pointless because it wouldn’t be addressed.

Another alleged aggressor said, “I have never had a single complaint against me in my career.” This begs the question – do employees genuinely enjoy working with him, or are employees just afraid to come forward?

Second, leaders need to behave the same way all the time, no matter the context. Ellen has been an icon in the media for years. She’s been revered as a trailblazer for LGBTQ+ visibility, caring philanthropist, comedian, talk show host – the list goes on. Simply put, people adore and idolize her.

However, former employees and even some of her guests claim that her behavior behind the scenes doesn’t reflect her image in the media. One even said, “she’s not the person people see in front of the camera.”

Those who have looked up to Ellen in the past are now wondering if her positivity is truly genuine or if it’s all an act. 

This is why it’s so important to live the core values you preach to others regularly. If you communicate that positivity is imperative, but allow negative behavior in your workplace, you’ll lose all credibility. Good luck trying to get employees on board with anything you do or say after that. 

Third, ignorance is not a defense. When it comes to the well-being of employees, top leaders are expected to be on high alert. Unfortunately Ellen’s apology letter shifts the blame from herself to other leaders, stating that she was unable to keep track of everything as the show grew and so she was unaware of these issues.

While this may be the truth, she’s ultimately responsible for monitoring other leaders and the organizational culture as a whole. In other words, even if she didn’t know, she SHOULD HAVE KNOWN because she should’ve been keeping track.

A toxic culture doesn’t just sprout up over night, it’s nurtured and encouraged to grow. As it grows, more and more symptoms of a negative work environment begin to emerge. Top leaders must be on the lookout for these warning signs, which may include high turnover or low productivity. 

At the end of the day

Top leaders have a long way to fall, and Ellen is a great example of that. Although other A-list celebrities are coming to her defense and claiming that Ellen is nothing but nice to them, the state of the workplace ultimately reflects back on leadership. 

Whether or not the allegations are true, her reputation and the reputation of The Ellen Show will be tarnished for a long time. She’s fallen from grace and it’ll be hard to come back from this.

Lesson learned from Ellen – top leaders must make a genuine effort to foster and stay on top of an environment where employees are happy, engaged and thriving.

Rebecca Del Secco
Consultant & Future VP

About Catherine Mattice Zundel

Catherine Mattice Zundel, MA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP is President of consulting and training firm, Civility Partners, and has been successfully providing programs in workplace bullying and building positive workplaces since 2007. Her clients include Fortune 500’s, the military, several universities and hospitals, government agencies, small businesses and nonprofits. She has published in a variety of trade magazines and has appeared several times on NPR, FOX, NBC, and ABC as an expert, as well as in USA Today, Inc Magazine, Huffington Post, Entrepreneur Magazine, and more. Catherine is Past-President of the Association for Talent Development (ATD), San Diego Chapter and teaches at National University. In his book foreword, Ken Blanchard called her book, BACK OFF! Your Kick-Ass Guide to Ending Bullying at Work, “the most comprehensive and valuable handbook on the topic.” She recently released a second book entitled, SEEKING CIVILITY: How Leaders, Managers and HR Can Create a Workplace Free of Bullying.

Are you still engaged in #BLM?

As you may know, every Thursday at 9:30 am Pacific I host “Catherine’s Corner” - my LinkedIn Live show where I invite distinguished guests to share their expertise on the working world today. One of my favorite shows was in the beginning with Eric Ellis, the President...

We’re Mad as Hell: Frat Boy Culture in the Gaming World

The sexist culture in the gaming industry doesn’t start and stop with Blizzard. According to this article in Forbes, “In 2020, 41% of video game players in the United States were female. Yet the vast majority of game protagonists are male… According to the 2020 Global...

1 Minute to Benchmark Your Organization

There’s been a lot of information going around about mask and vaccine mandates, return to work policies, and flexible work. There has been a whole lot less information going around about the most important topic: People. We are curious about the people component of...

What Stories Are Floating Around Your Workplace?

Last week we wrote about the internal and external dialogue one might have when considering whether to report bad behavior. It had us thinking about what might have been going through the minds of anyone employed in Cuomo’s office, as they witnessed or were told about...

Are you suurrre your workforce will report toxic behavior?

Recently I saw this article on HR Dive (a great enewsletter, by the way). It’s an interview with Wharton School professor G. Richard Shell, who recently released the book, “The Conscience Code.”   Shell talks about the internal and external dialogue one might have...

5 Tips for Reopening the Workplace + 2 Fantastic Resources

As we transition back to “normal,” employees are going to need extra support to help them through the extremely disruptive experience of the last 18 months. So far, however, it appears there’s a gap in perceptions of how supportive employers have actually been. These...

4 Ways to Measure Success of Flexible Work

Employers around the world jumped into flexible work last year without planning, preparation, or resources. In an unprecedented worldwide transformation of work, millions of people’s lives turned on a dime.   As COVID winds down (I hope) employers are at an impasse....

Defining and Investigating Bullying Behavior

Bullying behavior can take a tremendous toll on targets and witnesses—causing depression, burnout, and even symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD. Organizations with employees that report bullying behavior commonly experience reductions in work quality...

[CASE STUDY] Transforming Organizational Culture

We recently put together a case study regarding one of our clients, Rainbow Municipal Water District (RMWD), and thought we’d share it in case you were looking for ideas on improving your own workplace culture. The HR Manager and Executive Director came into a...

Are You Effectively Managing Performance?

Happy Wednesday!   This week we’re sharing an interview I did with my friend and business coach, Karie Kaufmann, on the topic of Managing Workplace Behaviors Beyond Job Performance.   We discussed how employees are often promoted to management positions because they...